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Reflections on the Past Year

Did 2018 fly by for you?  It did for the RealTime Talent team.  About this same time last year, we were welcoming our new Executive Director, Deb Broberg, to RealTime Talent and we had just finished moving into the Chamber Foundation location.  We adopted the mantra, “new year, new location, same mission.”  As the year moved on and we settled into our new home, we continued to focus on our mission: to help create more informed, market-oriented decisions throughout the Minnesota workforce and education ecosystem to ensure the state’s economy has the talent it needs to help Minnesotans prepare for well-paying careers.  We also continued our aim to create a movement toward workforce alignment, support sector-based collaborations for quality employment opportunities, increase cross-sector collaboration, and ensure daily decision-making is guided by strong data in the workforce and education ecosystem.  Phew!  That’s not only a mouthful – that’s a big task at hand!  It’s a great thing we have so many great partners dedicated to Minnesota’s workforce and economy. 

In 2018, RealTime Talent developed 113 data driven reports.  From occupation snapshots and industry overviews, to labor market analyses and custom-built surveys, we offered just-in-time insights to decision-makers and encouraged data-informed planning in our workforce and education systems.  Many of these reports are available on our website at http://www.realtimetalent.org/research.

We also gave 85 presentations and trained 310 participants on real-time labor market data tools both in the education and workforce space.  95 organizations and institutions of higher education that work with students, job-seekers, or employers currently had access to TalentNeuron Recruit and training and about 335-400 people currently use TalentNeuron Recruit on a regular basis in service to students, job-seekers, or employers. Between 6,400 and 7,350 job-seekers statewide received job search assistance that included data from TalentNeuron Recruit in FY2018, doubling the reach of the tool in 2017.

An estimated 7,200 students were advised using data from TalentNeuron Recruit in FY2018, with many more being reached with modified curriculum, programs, and materials that introduced them to high-demand career pathways.  Approximately 60% of users working directly with students said use of TalentNeuron Recruit “increased the relevance of job opportunities to student needs” between April and October 2018.

RealTime Talent continued to use its unique position as a public-private partner to bring creative solutions to Minnesota’s labor shortage, skill misalignment, and labor market inefficiencies. 

In K-12 education, we expanded TalentNeuron access and training, developed customized career pathway reports, and provided data consultation to Career and Technical Education (CTE) consortia across Minnesota, leading to in-depth engagement and increased use of labor market data in the classroom.  For Higher Education, RealTime Talent created customized reports or provided consultation around program development, expansion, modification, as well as regional workforce data for institutions including, but not limited to, The College of St. Scholastica, St. Cloud State University, Normandale Community College, and AgCentric Center of Excellence.   Some of RealTime Talent’s contributions to the workforce system include engagement with the Greater Metropolitan Workforce Council’s workforce planning efforts, supporting the sector committee, data work team, and the strategic partnership team in employer engagement and securing appropriate labor market data.  RealTime Talent also supported the curriculum and delivery of the GMWC Sector Skills Academy, focusing on data-informed decision-making and employer engagement strategy.  We were privileged to collaborate with the DEED Workforce Strategy Consultants and the Center for Economic Inclusion to support the GMWC and local Workforce Development Board employer engagement needs in the six key industry sectors. 


Left to right: Tawanna Black, Center for Economic Inclusion , Peter Frosch, GREATER MSP, Laura Beeth, Fairview Health Services, Shawntera Hardy, Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development , Deb Broberg, RealTime Talent

This past year,  RTT established a Business Talent Initiative, with the support of GreaterMSP, MSPWin, the Minnesota Chamber, MN Business Partnership, and the Itasca Project, to facilitate employer involvement in partnership with key sector team leads: MPMA, Hennepin County, AgriGrowth, and MHTA.  This Business Talent Initiative is now a working group within RealTime Talent’s Advisory Council.  We continued the development of diversity reports and talent sourcing strategy consulting for private companies and business associations, provided labor market data for industry membership organizations, and solidified relationships with the commercial building trades associations, offering demographic and workforce data for four quarters to help guide apprenticeship program enrollment planning.

We look forward to the work ahead of us in 2019 and collaborating with our partners in the great state of Minnesota. 

If you have any questions about the work of RealTime Talent, please contact Phil Arellano, phil@realtimetalent.org.

Content contributed by Phil Arellano and Erin Olson, RealTime Talent.

As Labor Shortage Looms, Metro Workforce Planning Ramps Up

The 7-county Minneapolis-Saint Paul region faces a worker shortage of over 62,000 by 2020. RealTime Talent and MSP Win are bringing new research to the table to help workforce planners mobilize around our current and future needs, an essential step if we are to maintain our region’s growth and competitiveness.

Workforce development professionals must be able to quickly support each jobseeker to identify and train for the career they aspire to; using data analytics on a regular basis creates stronger coordination between organizations and the best results for both jobseekers and employers.
In the last few years, a range of online analytical tools have enabled a clear view of our dynamic and constantly changing labor market. For the first time, this data is available to job counselors not just as information for reflection, but as a real-time action tool to direct jobseekers to the best opportunities.

We have developed a series of Sector Analysis Reports – a regional overview document and its one-page profiles of IT, manufacturing, construction, healthcare, business and financial services, and government – to provide an analytical methodology to know and react to demand, supply, and training program outcomes. In other words, these tools can help us more efficiently close the worker gap. We hope that you see value in this data and decide to replicate this kind of analysis in your own sectors and communities.

We believe workforce development must now be based on a real-time feedback loop. If you don’t know the analytics and if you can’t easily answer the top two jobseeker questions in an informed way, you can’t advise jobseekers well and you can’t help close the gap. So let’s start doing things differently.

Read, download, or print the full reports here, or take a look at the Information Technology sector overview report here.

Building Minnesota’s Workforce: Realistic approaches to address our need for more workers

Minnesota will soon face a significant labor shortage. In some key industries, the shortage is already being felt acutely by employers. If unemployment rates, existing racial and ethnic employment disparities, and trends in migration continue, we can expect only an average 0.35% annual increase in employment between 2016 and 2022. This is due in large part to the rapid retirement rate of the baby boomer generation, and the decreasing rate of participation in the labor force of young people.

This graphic, originally developed in October 2016 and now updated with new data and insights, offers a simplified 6-year outlook at the impact of several challenging, yet important goals for the future employment of Minnesotans.

Late last year, RealTime Talent used the data published by the MN Demographic Center to take a deeper look at recent employment trends, migration patterns, and Minnesota’s gross state product. We found that Minnesota will need about 278 thousand additional workers above which we anticipate to be employed by 2022. That means we need between 40 and 45 thousand additional workers each year to maintain our current rate of economic growth.

Modest improvements to this scenario can be obtained through some familiar kinds of interventions in the functioning of the labor force. Namely, increasing labor force participation and focusing on increasing employment rates. However, even if we take the most optimistic outlook, we will likely still fall short at least 200 thousand workers by 2022 across the state. In the years ahead, we will need new and diverse strategies for attracting and retaining talent from both domestic and international sources, as well as creative approaches to increasing the productivity of Minnesota’s existing workforce.

For more information, download the graphic here.

Revolutionize How Your Company Finds Talent: The RealTime Talent Exchange

The RealTime Talent Exchange Leapfrogs Other Posting Systems

 

Hey Minnesota employers! Every day you work hard to attract, develop, and retain the talent your organization needs for today and for the future. This important and time-consuming work starts with hiring the right people for the right roles. The RealTime Talent Exchange can help!

 

The Exchange provides cutting-edge technology that creates a more efficient and effective labor market by moving away from the sole use of traditional recruiting practices toward a new matching technology that leapfrogs other online tools. This innovative technology helps employers fill open positions by easily accessing candidates who are the best possible fit.

 

Here’s how it works.

The Exchange surveys employers and candidates about needs, interests, abilities, and preferences using a set of statistically validated questions for the specific role. Then, the system uses patent-pending algorithms to create matches, instantly connecting employers and job seekers. This cuts the time and cost of recruiting and serves the unique needs of small, mid-sized, and large employers. Built on WorkFountain technology, this innovative platform allows your organization to make meaningful connections and find the best person for the job–faster than ever before.

 

Some key benefits for employers:

  • One-stop exposure to top talent, regardless of recruiting budget or name recognition
  • Job board broadcasting and social media promotion
  • Centralized scoring, screening, and stack ranking of candidates
  • Prioritized shortlist of top matches to consider first
  • Cost effective ($39 per job posting and $19 per internship posting)

 

Now in the pre-launch phase, this new online labor Exchange will be officially launching in February. View the site now at www.realtime.workfountain.com. There are early opportunities for large employers, regional economic development bodies, academic institutions, and others to become hosts or create enterprise accounts on the new platform. If your organization is interested in this kind of opportunity,  please contact Jess@realtimetalentmn.org

Central Minnesota

The 13-county Central Minnesota planning region had a population of 693,108 in 2014, almost 13% of the state’s population. With a larger population, yet a similar volume of jobs posted compared to other Greater Minnesota regions, the number of people in the labor force per job opening (potential candidates indicated below) is very high. This is the result of the region’s highly mobile labor force, with over 40% of the region’s working residents commuting outside of the region to get to their place of work according to one DEED analysis of the commute shed. Central Minnesota is a net exporter of labor with only 198,956 workers both residing and working in the region in 2013 according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

According to DEED’s Occupational Employment Statistics, about 16% of all jobs held in Central Minnesota are in production manufacturing, whereas production comprises only 11% of all jobs statewide. Healthcare and social assistance jobs are expected to increase in demand by over 28% through 2022, while production manufacturing is expected to increase by only 3%. In 2014, DEED identified ten industry sub-sectors that define the region by having significantly higher concentrations of jobs and firms than seen statewide. Overall, Central Minnesota has 9.7% of the state’s total employment, but is home to 25% of the state’s employment in animal production, furniture, and related product manufacturing. The projected slowed growth of manufacturing and production in the region is of particular concern for the local communities that rely on these economic niches, which are extremely diverse across the eastern and western subregions of Central Minnesota.

Transportation services are in high demand in Central Minnesota, accounting for 17% of all jobs advertised online to date in 2016. Healthcare positions are the second most sought, with 14% of all postings pertaining to this sector. When health support occupations are included (3.2% pf the postings), the total healthcare function positions lead as the most-sought positions in the region. These types of jobs are typically advertised online whenever openings are available, and counts are a relatively strong representation of regional labor needs. However, a number of critical industries continue to post job openings in very low volumes and may under count actual need. Some of these industries include forestry and logging, paper manufacturing, electric power generation and transmission, and mining. Highly unionized industries and temporary or seasonal positions are also not advertised online in large volumes, and other data sources might capture the true number of vacancies better.

For the full report and a list of additional relevant data sources, see our Reports page.

 

Northwestern Minnesota

 

The Northwest region of Minnesota is mostly rural and has an economy dominated by agriculture. With a population of 595,370 in an area of 29,904 square miles and 26 counties, it contains wide expanses of agricultural land and 29.5% of the state’s farms according to the USDA in 2012. The region contains only 8% of total employment in Minnesota based on DEED’s Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages. Some of the largest cities in this region include Moorhead (pop. 42,005, #21), Bemidji (pop. 14,594, #70), and Brainerd (pop. 13,371, #78).

DEED identifies three distinguishing industries of the Minnesota’s Northwest: pipeline transportation; fishing, hunting and trapping; transportation equipment manufacturing. The Northwest contains over 40% of the state’s jobs in these three industries. This is reflected in the industries that saw the most job postings online during the first three quarters of 2016. The vast majority of jobs were posted by freight trucking companies – both long-haul and local – or by temp and staffing agencies hiring for drivers, manufacturing, and agricultural labor.

Capturing the job openings in agriculture, fishing, hunting, and related positions can be challenging, as many positions are not publicly advertised. The chart below shows the number of production agriculture, environment, fishing, and hunting jobs that were advertised online in the region during the first three quarters of 2016. Counts for farm workers, breeders, fish and game wardens, and equipment operators were likely significantly higher than what these counts reveal.

Although DEED’s Occupational Employment Statistics found administrative support positions to employ the most people in the region in 2015 and food service to have the most vacancies, it was actually transportation jobs that were advertised much more frequently. Transportation jobs comprised 25% of all jobs advertised online in Nothwest Minnesota in the first three quarters of 2016. Healthcare practitioners and sales positions are also in high demand, making up 14% and 8% of the total 58,800 jobs in the region, respectively. Education, training, and library occupations are increasing in demand in this region, with job postings up by 66% since 2015. Hard skills in demand in the Northwest include pediatrics, quality assurance, geriatrics, behavioral health, and technical support experience.

For more information on Minnesota’s Northwest, view our new report here.

 

Sources:

TalentNeuron Recruit for online job counts.  www.wantedanalytics.com

DEED Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) http://mn.gov/deed/data/data-tools/qcew/

DEED Distinguishing Industries https://mn.gov/deed/assets/sept-2015-trends-distinguishing_tcm1045-212016.pdf

DEED Occupational Employment Statistics https://mn.gov/deed/data/data-tools/oes/

 

Southwestern Minnesota

 

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Today we released the report on Southwestern Minnesota’s online job market.

Southwestern Minnesota’s economy is dominated by production manufacturing–particularly in agricultural production–and healthcare.  About 25 percent of jobs in these industries were held by workers 55 and older in 2015.  Home to 7 percent of the state’s population, the Southwest is sparsely populated.  Mankato (pop. 41,040) is the largest city in the region, ranking as the 22nd largest in the state in 2014 (US Census Bureau Population Estimates).

The top five job titles advertised online in the Southwest since 2012 are 1. Registered Nurse, 2. Class A CDL Truck Driver, 3. Physical Therapist, 4. Owner Operator, and 5. Licensed Practical Nurse.  Of the 6 major regions, the Southwest had the second highest median advertised salary  in 2016 at $56,100/year.  No major local or regional job boards could be identified in our research, and overall job posting volume is low in the region, but proportionate to its population similar to the Southeast and Northeast. In contrast, the Northwest and Central regions have many more people competing for fewer jobs, and the Twin Cities Metro has fewer people per job opening.

Recruitment for truck drivers is booming in the Southwest, with 30 percent of jobs advertised in the first three quarters of 2016 being transportation and shipping positions–tripling in number since 2015. Healthcare practitioners are also in high demand, making up 12.5 percent of the total 51,464 jobs advertised in the region between January and the end of September this year. The number of job postings seeking sales, business development, and information technology professionals declined since 2015. In demand certifications include a commercial driver’s license, HAZMAT, nursing certifications, and CPR.

Download the full report here: rtt-2016-regional-labor-market-southwest

 

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Foundational Research on Minnesota’s Regional Labor Markets is Released

RealTime Talent has been busy developing a series of regional strategies to help academic, workforce, government, and economic development professionals across Minnesota better use data to respond to local job markets and labor force needs.  The executive summary of the 40-page report on Minnesota’s diverse landscape of job opportunities was released publicly today, November 30th, after being shared with colleagues and stakeholders closest to the data.  Throughout the month of December, RealTime Talent will post segments of this larger report that highlight each region in its own blog post.  At the end of the month, we will close with the full, 40-page report and a special statewide workforce gap graphic that we have been developing for several months with support from our partners.  We can’t wait to share the insights we have uncovered in this rich online job posting data from TalentNeuron Recruit, and hope this work supports your own professional practice wherever you work in our wonderful state.

We encourage you to get excited for the release of these unique reports by reviewing the executive summary and tuning in December 2nd for the first regional installment on Southeast Minnesota!

rtt-2016-regional-labor-markets-executive-summary-final

 

Survey Results: What Matters Most to Job Seekers

We asked our Minnesota community what they value most in a job, and overall the responses are what you might expect: compensation and maintaining a positive work/life balance are critical. However, we noticed some interesting differences between job seekers of different age groups that suggest compensation may not be the first thing that younger members of the workforce are seeking; many seem to value the flexibility to work remotely and working for a cause they can believe in more than money.

 

rtt-job-seekers-survey-pieFirst, it is important to note that we did not receive nearly enough responses to make broad assumptions about all Minnesotans.  Out of the 50 responses we received, 35 (70%) were from people between the ages of 25 and 44, 7 (14%) were between 16 and 24, and 7 (14%) were between 45 and 64. One person responded who was older than 64.  While we can’t draw any statistical conclusions from these results, they are still an interesting snapshot to consider and our results do
echo other studies on the topic. Please take our results as a fun, casual look at what job seekers in the RealTime Talent community value most in their place of work.

 

It would be wrong to assume that compensation is the first thing that all job seekers pay attention to when considering a new job. In fact, our survey suggests that maintaining a healthy balance between work and life activities and seeking a company with a positive mission may be more important to some young job seekers. Compensation ranked third overall for young people, with not even a single respondent in the 16-24 age group indicating compensation as their first consideration in a job.  Working remotely is also a unique value of young job seekers.  Every participant in our survey ranked workplace flexibility somewhere between #1 to #5 in importance. These responses may be tied to how people in this age group define a positive work/life balance. The least important consideration for survey participants in the 16-24 year old group was the leadership of the company they consider.

rttjobseekers16

While compensation appears to become more important to older job seekers, 25-44 year olds still report that maintaining a positive work/life balance is the most important consideration. Job seekers in this age group were more likely to indicate that opportunities for advancement in a job were a swaying factor in a job offer. Company leadership was slightly more important to 25-44 year olds than for younger job seekers, but having flexibility to work remotely was less important on average among this older group. Health benefits ranked as the least important factor.

rttjobseekers25

There was a high level of consensus among the few responses received from job seekers between the ages of 45 and 64. Unanimously, these participants indicated compensation as the #1 or #2 most important factor in considering a job offer, with maintaining work/life balance coming in second place on average.  Location was also important to all survey participants in this age group, with every participant ranking place of work in their top three. Job seekers between 45 and 64 years of age also report the importance of health benefits when considering a job, pointing to the increased need for medical services with age. Opportunities for advancement rank last in this age group with every respondent ranking it in the lower half of the options given. These limited findings may suggest that many workers over 45 are finished with trying to climb the achievement ladder and are instead looking to receive the benefits of their hard work.

rttjobseekers45

Based on these results and the few studies cited above, it is impossible to determine whether these differences in job seekers focus are a result of changing values and roles as workers age, or signs of broader generational differences. There have been many hypotheses lately on the differences between Millennials, Gen X-ers, and Baby Boomers in the workplace, with hundreds of firms fighting for their place in a $150 billion global HR consulting space.  However, other studies suggest that the generations may not be so different after all. IBM’s Institute for Business Value released a report in 2014 based on 1,784 employees across the globe that found workers across all generations share similar workplace values. Nationally, CNBC found similar results in 2015. Multiple studies have found that across generation, race, and gender, employees tend to want the same things out of their work. Instead, it seems to be the importance of each factor and the way that these factors are defined that shifts with age and life stage.

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Albert Lea’s Workforce Development Inc. Uses Data to Get People Jobs

With Minnesota’s labor force growth projected to flatline, many businesses and community leaders are concerned about what this shortage of workers will mean for the health of local businesses and regional economies.  In Albert Lea, they aren’t satisfied with worrying about the problem; placement specialists with Workforce Development Inc. are using new data sources like TalentNeuron Recruit (formerly Wanted Analytics) to search thousands of online postings in Freeborn County and get job seekers placed in those jobs quicker.

The Albert Lea Tribune released a story in July titled “Meeting the Workforce Challenge: A Need for Workers,” highlighting how the city is using real-time labor force data to help job seekers successfully find work in their region.  Take a look to see how Minnesotans are rising to the labor force challenge.

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