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Labor Market Data in Career and Technical Education

As Career and Technical Education awareness month comes to an end, we acknowledge our many partners that play a vital role in CTE and thank you for all your hard work in this space.  RealTime Talent has long collaborated with many of our CTE partners to provide labor market and career data aimed to inform students and job-seekers.  In 2017, through Perkins federal funding, we created a series of reports offering insight into three career clusters through the lens of employer demand including Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources, Business, Management, & Administration, and Finance.  These reports, along with a series of career pathways reports, were distributed among CTE coordinators and educators throughout Minnesota.  To view or download these reports, click HERE.

Last November, RealTime Talent developed career pathway handouts for the White Bear Lake area school district, highlighting four key areas including Healthcare, Manufacturing, Construction, and IT pathways in Ramsey County. “These youth-friendly handouts were created to inform students on the career building jobs they may qualify for now or in the near future,” said Erin Olson, RealTime Talent Research Strategist.  “By using school colors and images like emojis, these reports are appealing to the reader and can spark great conversation about these careers.”

Jenny Moore, the Career Pathways Navigator for the White Bear Lake Area Schools said, “I love everything about these reports” as she distributed them at a career expo attended by over 300 students and more than 70 industry partners.  “It is truly amazing what RealTime Talent has done for our local community.”  After Jenny shared these reports with secondary educators in her district, Shannon Grant, a Health and Physical Education Teacher at White Bear Lake High School, used the reports for a unique classroom assignment.  Her students used the data provided on the career pathway handouts to gain insights and do further research on a career they may be interested in.  These students experienced a fun way to engage in career exploration and developed some creative handouts of their own as well.

Creative work from a WBL student inspired by career data.

As we continue to promote the use of tools that address labor force needs and support our education system, RealTime Talent has been working with multiple CTE consortia, providing training and data consultation with TalentNeuron – a real-time job post data tool.  Recently, RealTime Talent trained 30 career counselors and educators from the Wayzata area high schools.  We look forward to how these educators will incorporate real-time labor and career information into their own classes.  If you are an educator who’s interested in our research services or real-time labor market tools, reach out to us today! 

If you have any questions about the work of RealTime Talent with Career and Technical Education, please contact Phil Arellano.

Insights For Action

How the MSP Region is Addressing the Growing Talent Crisis with Analysis of Real-time Labor Market Data

In the last few years, a range of online analytical tools has enabled a clear view of our dynamic and constantly changing labor market. For the first time, this data is available to job counselors and planners not just as information for reflection, but as a real-time action tool to direct jobseekers to the best opportunities. This report outlines our approach to taking the first step in addressing this crisis: documenting the labor shortage and skills gap, identifying the impact that our programs and initiatives could have on closing those gaps, and building a strategy for a more systematic and employer-led long-term solution.

We believe workforce development must now be based on a real-time feedback loop. Without a clear line of sight into the current labor market realities, it is impossible to advise job-seekers effectively, meet employer talent needs, or plan effective educational systems. We have learned that in a program-rich, systems-poor environment, context in real dataand short-term outcomes can help move out of the spin-cycle of planning and into systems change.

However, a strong report alone will not lead to systematic change, better programs, or improved outcomes without engaging the necessary leaders to take the next step. Even after reviewing the wealth of LMI, job postings, and educational data at our disposal, it is still essential to get out in the field and talk to employers, training program managers, K-12 educators, and postsecondary directors get their take on the accuracy and relevancy of the data and your conclusions from it.  Only then can we identify solutions that ensure employers have the workers required to sustain and grow Minnesota’s economy.

Real Time Talent and MSPWin will continue to promote and expand demand-driven solutions that are grounded in the realities of talent supply limitations and opportunities. We hope that this implementation guide is an important step toward building the next generation of cross-sector, employer-led education and workforce collaboratives to address the workforce challenges of our time.

Click HERE to read the full report.

Top Trending Entry-Level Healthcare Positions Focus on In-Home Care

It’s no secret that there is huge demand for Home Health Aides across the United States.  The Bureau of Labor Statistics put out a report early last year, and the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development (DEED) followed suit in June 2016 with their article, “H is for Home Health Aide.” But will these positions be attractive to future workers who will have increasingly more choice in our nation’s job market and are looking for opportunities that offer a living wage and professional advancement?  Maybe not, unless employers start changing what they offer.

As many Minnesotans age and require additional medical attention (the population of Minnesotans over 65 years of age will increase by more than 400,000 people between 2014 and 2024), the need for Healthcare Support Professionals is increasing rapidly. Couple that with a growing preference to receive care in the home rather than in a care facility, the demand for Home Health Aides is skyrocketing.  In 2016, there were approximately 27,550 Home Health Aides working in the state and 4,457 Home Health Aide job openings advertised online; the occupation ranks as the 21st most in-demand position and the 20th most common occupation in Minnesota today.  Demand is projected to grow by 30.1 percent (9,254 jobs) between 2014 and 2024–the third highest growth rate of any occupation in Minnesota. However, these positions offer some of the lowest salaries of any occupation in the healthcare industry, with a median wage of $24,944 and currently advertised positions only offering $20-26k as a starting salary–just barely hitting the threshold for a living wage for a single adult ($11.39 in Hennepin County).  There may be little incentive to encourage workers to take on these roles as the number of job opportunities begins to exceed the number of available workers in the laborforce.

We are already observing high rates of job vacancies in entry-level healthcare positions that require an Associate’s degree or less.  Online job postings in the Twin Cities Metro for low-experience, low-education Licensed Practical Nurses and Home Health Aides have increased more than 7% since 2015, dramatically greater than other entry-level healthcare opportunities.  Hennepin County was home to 24% of the state’s total entry-level healthcare positions in 2016.

As Minnesota continues to face changing demographics, how will employers respond to ensure that they attract the candidates they need? Hopefully, we will start to see rising wages for entry-level healthcare positions.

For more data on healthcare occupations at the Twin Cities and Statewide level, check out our reports page.

Twin Cities Healthcare Report, March 2017

Minnesota Healthcare Report, March 2017

Northeastern Minnesota

Home to 326,649 people in 2014, just 6% of the state’s population resides in Northeastern Minnesota–the beautiful Arrowhead Region. St. Louis County is the region’s largest county by size and population with approximately 61.5% of the region’s population. Jobs are highly concentrated around the region’s largest city, Duluth, which is located in St. Louis County. South and western counties of the region are growing at the fastest rates (Carlton and Itasca), while northeastern counties have seen steadily declining populations since 2000 (Koochiching and Lake).

Healthcare jobs account for 29% of the 41,516 jobs advertised online in the region this year to date. The second most common types of job advertised in Northeast Minnesota were transportation-related, specifically for heavy tractor trailers and heavy truck driving. Manufacturing, construction, engineering, and marketing each saw notable decreases in job posting volume between 2015 and 2016. Some unique industry niches of the region, though not significantly represented in online job postings, include forestry and logging, paper manufacturing, electric power generation and transmission, and mining.

For more information on the Northeast’s unique labor market, view the report here.

 

How One Organization Used Real-Time Data to Explore Healthcare Recruiting in the Twin Cities

Labor market data (LMI) from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, DEED, and the U.S. Census Bureau can tell as a lot about our state’s economy and labor force: our current unemployment rate, how successful college graduates are in getting jobs, and disparities in employment by race and ethnicity, to name just a few. These traditional data sources are invaluable to academics, economic development planners, and workforce developers who need hard data on Minnesota’s labor force statewide. In many cases, this data is also available regionally by DEED’s economic development regions, and sometimes by metropolitan area. However, these traditional data sources tell us very little about which employers are hiring now, the kinds of hard and soft skills that are currently in demand, or where job vacancies are advertised.

LifeScience Alley is one organization that is using new real-time labor market data from TalentNeuron Recruit alongside traditional LMI sources to analyze detailed healthcare recruiting trends in Minnesota. In their Quarter 2 workforce report, they found significant demand for engineers, making up 17 percent of all open positions advertised online by healthcare companies.  Medical device manufacturers, IVD, and pharmaceutical firms were found to have the most open positions during that quarter, with most job openings seeking candidates with skills in quality systems and quality assurance. They also discovered that most positions advertised in the Twin Cities were concentrated in the northwest in cities like Plymouth and Fridley.

Take a look at LifeScience Alley’s report to learn more about the healthcare industry in the Twin Cities metro, or use this as an example of how other organizations might use this data source to better understand their local labor force economy.

2015-08-24_life_science_alley_workforce_report

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